evolutionyou.net | farm to fridge

Eating clean and green is not easy—don’t let anybody fool you!—but there are things that you can do to simplify. After we picked up our first CSA box, I went straight to work. Cleaning, peeling, and cutting oh my! I made it fun, put on my favourite playlist, and got moral support from my husband. An hour or so later and I had gone from farm to fridge.

evolutionyou.net | farm to fridge

carrots
run your carrots under cold water. cut off ends. use a vegetable peeler to peel off skin. rinse under cold water once more. cut carrots in half length-wise. then, cut in half width-wise twice. this will give you pieces perfect for snacking, salads, or stir fry.

red leaf lettuce
break off each leaf. rinse thoroughly. cut into bite-sized pieces.

kale
rinse thoroughly. cut into large or bite-sized pieces. (large to saute later or bite-sized for raw kale salad.)

tomatoes
i leave my tomatoes alone until i am ready to eat them. they are too juicy to mess with.

shallots
peel and cut into quarters.

garlic
garlic is tricky. i peeled mine and cut into halves. however, it smelled up our fridge like no other. i’ve triple-bagged the garlic and it’s alright now. next time, i will perhaps simply remove outer skin but leave inner skin intact until cook time.

radish
rinse thoroughly. cut off ends. cut radishes into slices perfect for snacking or salad topping.

yellow + green squash
rinse thoroughly. cut squash into thick slices. then, cut slices into quarters. my favourite way to prepare squash is in a light olive oil or coconut oil stir fry. i’ve found that these quarters cook through perfectly.

string beans
rinse beans thoroughly. cut off ends. then, cut beans in half. makes a good snack or easy to throw into a stir fry or boil.

evolutionyou.net | farm to fridge

It was a little bit of a time sink upfront, but it has made snacking and meal prep so much healthier + simpler all week. This will become a new part of my weekend routine. So worth it!

6 thoughts on “From Farm to Fridge”

  1. Just a thought regarding the garlic. I share a house with my best friend who’s an enthusiastic gardener and grows garlic. So we have a lot of the stuff. Peel several blubs, throwing it in blender, or food processor and chop it up fine. Then we put it in an airtight container and pour olive oil (or some other oil) till it covers the top. It seems to keep quite well for several weeks and you can add what you need to soups, pasta dishes, whatever. I say, several weeks, we eat a lot of it so it doesn’t last that in our case, lol.

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